Course Descriptions for Mathematics

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Algebra I

Algebra I is the first course in the college-preparatory mathematics program.  Students learn basic algebraic concepts.  They develop skills in simplifying expressions and solving equations and practice graphing linear and quadratic equations.  They learn to manipulate variables as they develop a facility with signed numbers, simple factoring, and multiple formulas.  They practice graphing linear and quadratic equations.  This course provides the foundation for high school mathematics.  Pre-algebra is a prerequisite.

Honors Algebra I

Students are challenged in Honors Algebra I to learn and apply the curriculum described above in order to solve complex problems in algebra.  A strong background in pre-algebra is a must for students to qualify for this course.  Students must be recommended for this course.

Geometry

This course covers a systematic study of the nature of deductive and analytical proofs.  Students learn to establish congruence and similarity for triangles and other polygons.  Special properties of isosceles, equilateral, and right triangles are explored in depth.  Students study perimeters, areas, and volumes of a variety of geometric figures.  They explore the concepts of perpendicular and parallel lines and planes.  This course provides a traditional foundation in Euclidean geometry.  Algebra I is a prerequisite.

Honors Geometry

Students are challenged in Honors Geometry to learn to use the material studied in the Geometry curriculum in order to write sophisticated proofs of complex theorems.  Additional topics include coordinate geometry and trigonometry.  Algebra I is a prerequisite.  Students must be recommended for this course.

Algebra II/Trigonometry

Algebra II reviews and expands basic algebraic concepts and skills covered in Algebra I and Geometry.  Students learn a higher level of mathematical thinking and greater skill in working with numbers and algebraic expressions, equations, and inequalities.  Among other topics, they study complex numbers, functions, linear systems, quadratic functions, radical equations, and trigonometry.  This course provides the background for pre-calculus.  Algebra I is a prerequisite.

Honors Algebra II/Trigonometry

Students are challenged in Honors Algebra II/Trigonometry to cover the regular Algebra II curriculum in depth with less attention to a review of Algebra I concepts.  In addition to the topics covered by the regular Algebra II/Trigonometry class, the Honors class covers conic sections.  Algebra I is a prerequisite.  Students must be recommended for this course.

Math classes are diversified so that students interested in pursuing STEM careers and those who are not can take math courses that will relate to them.

Precalculus Honors/Precalculus I & Precalculus II (Math 101 & Math 102)

This challenging course prepares our most serious students for theoretical college calculus by challenging them to solve rigorous and complex problems with an in-depth knowledge of higher level functions as described in Precalculus. This is a dual enrollment course with Shenandoah University. The students will earn six hours of college credit upon completion.  Algebra II/Trigonometry and Geometry are pre-requisites.  Students must be recommended for this course. 

Advanced Placement Calculus AB/Calculus I (Math 201)

Calculus is the mathematical tool used to analyze changes in physical quantities. This is a dual enrollment course with Shenandoah University. This course deals with differentiation and integration of algebraic and transcendental functions with applications. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive four hours of college credit as well as complete the Advanced Placement AB exam. Precalculus is a prerequisite.  Students must be recommended for this course.

Advanced Placement Calculus BC/Calculus II (Math 202)

This is another dual enrollment course with Shenandoah University. The beginning of the course reviews Calculus AB and Calculus I.  This course then continues with differential equations, applications of integration, advanced integration techniques, infinite series, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and vectors. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will receive four hours of college credit as well as complete the Advanced Placement BC exam. Calculus I is a prerequisite.  Students must be recommended for this course.

Statistics

Statistics is the mathematical science used in collecting, analyzing and developing conclusions from data. It is a two-semester course that concentrates four major conceptual themes:  exploring data, sampling and experimentation, anticipating patterns, and statistical inference.  Upon successfully completing the course, the student will take the Advanced Placement exam and may earn advanced placement or credit for a one semester introductory college statistics course.  Students must be recommended for this course.  Algebra II/Trigonometry is a prerequisite.

Computer Literacy

This one-semester course is required for graduation.   The course covers computer literacy terminology, telecommunications, advanced word processing, desktop publishing, web page designing, spreadsheets, databases, and slide show presentations.  The windows operating system is taught.  Students also learn to format documents in word processing such as letters, lists, outlines, and reports. Telecommunications are discussed and students send emails, and practice researching on the Internet.  The course covers keyboarding, Word, Excel, Access, Outlook, Publisher, PowerPoint and Front Page.

Computer Programming in Engineering

The course is an standard level course that is designed to instruct students in the basic understanding of computer programming through investigating and solving a variety of basic engineering problems.  This introduction to programming will include designing decision logic and user interfaces by organizing common program language structures and learning the language specific syntax for Microsoft Visual Basic.  The general principles of engineering projects will also be introduced as a framework for examining problems and developing computer-based solutions.  An additional goal is to teach advanced functions and uses for standard Microsoft Excel capabilities.  

Advanced Mathematics-- Transition to College Mathematics and Statistics

This problem-based, inquiry-oriented, fourth-year high school mathematics course is intended for students who do not plan to major in the mathematical, physical, or biological sciences or engineering.  This TCMS course consists of Interpreting Categorical Data, Functions Modeling Change, Counting Methods, Mathematics of Financial Decision-Making, Binomial Distributions and Statistical Inference, Informatics, Spatial Visualization and Representations, and Mathematics of Democratic Decision-Making.